THE UNDERSTANDING OF COVID19

COVID-19 in Pennsylvania

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COVID-19 in Pennsylvania

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The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new virus that causes respiratory illness in people and can spread from person-to-person. This virus was first identified during an investigation into an outbreak in Wuhan, China.

All Pennsylvanians have an important role to play in stopping the spread of COVID-19 and saving lives. Here are resources to help individuals, families, and businesses do their part.

Keep checking back. This guide will be kept up to date as resources and information change.

You can find up-to-date information about cases in Pennsylvania at on.pa.gov/coronavirus.


  

Watch for symptoms

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.

The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.*

· Fever

· Cough

· Shortness of breath

Stay at Home Order

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COVID-19 in Pennsylvania

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All 67 Pennsylvania counties are now under a Stay at Home order through April 30.

All individuals in counties subject to this policy must STAY AT HOME except for certain essential activities and work to provide life-sustaining business and government services.

See Governor Wolf’s order and the Secretary of Health’s order.

Law enforcement officers should refer to Business Closure Order Enforcement Guidance available online here.

Allowable Activities and Travel

Allowable Individual Activities

Individuals may leave their residence ONLY to perform any of the following allowable individual
 

  

Watch for symptoms

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.

The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.*

· Fever

· Cough

· Shortness of breath
 

Activities and Allowable Essential Travel. P1

Activities and Allowable Essential Travel. P1

Activities and Allowable Essential Travel. P1

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· Tasks essential to maintain health and safety, or the health and safety of their family or household members (including, but not limited to, pets), such as obtaining medicine or medical supplies, visiting a health care professional, or obtaining supplies they need to work from home.

· Getting necessary services or supplies for themselves or their family or household members, or to
deliver those services or supplies to others, such as getting food and household consumer
products, pet food, and supplies necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and essential
operation of residences. This includes volunteer efforts to distribute meals and other life-sustaining services to those in need.

· Engaging in outdoor activity, such as walking, hiking or running if they maintain social distancing.

· To perform work providing essential products and services at a life-sustaining business (see below for details about life-sustaining business activities).

· To care for a family member or pet in another household.

Allowable Essential Travel

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Activities and Allowable Essential Travel. P2

Activities and Allowable Essential Travel. P1

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· Any travel related to the provision of or access to the above-mentioned individual activities or life-sustaining business activities (see below for details about life-sustaining business activities).

· Travel to care for elderly, minors, dependents, persons with disabilities, or other vulnerable
persons.

· Travel to or from educational institutions for purposes of receiving materials for distance learning, for receiving meals, and any other related services.

· Travel to return to a place of residence from an outside jurisdiction.

· Travel required by law enforcement or court order.

· Travel required for non-residents to return to their place of residence outside the commonwealth.

· Anyone performing life-sustaining travel does not need paperwork to prove the reason for travel.

Exemptions

  

Watch for symptoms

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.

The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.*

· Fever

· Cough

· Shortness of breath

How to Protect Yourself P1

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How to Protect Yourself P1

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Know How It Spreads                               There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.

 The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person. Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Clean Hands Often:

 Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.

 Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid Close Contact:

· Avoid close contact with people who are sick

Put distance between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick

How to Protect Yourself P2

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 Cover coughs and sneezes :

 Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

 Throw used tissues in the trash.

 Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

 Wear a facemask if you are sick:

If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.

· If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.

 Clean and disinfect:

 Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.

· If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.